The number of NHS delayed transfers because of social care problems has fallen by 40%.

Figures released by NHS England for June show that the number of acute and non-acute delayed days caused by social care issues fell to 40,209, down from 66,938 in the same month in 2017.

In acute, the three main reasons for the delays were awaiting a care package in own home (9,183), waiting for a residential home placement or availability (5,618) and awaiting completion of assessment (4,112).

For non-acute, the three top reasons were awaiting a care package in own home (5,388), waiting for a residential home placement or availability (3,818) and awaiting nursing home placement or availability (2,527).

The number of delayed transfers because of NHS problems also fell. In total, there were 134,326 delayed transfers of care in June – caused by problems in the NHS and social care, or both. This is down from 177,881 in June 2017 – representing a 24% drop.

Councillor Izzi Seccombe, chairman of the Local Government Association’s community wellbeing board, said: ‘Councils have now reduced the average number of delayed transfers of care days attributed to social care since June 2017 by 40 per cent.

‘To help reduce pressures on the NHS, adult social care needs to be put on an equal footing with the health service and councils need urgent funding to invest in effective prevention work to reduce the need for people to be admitted to hospital in the first place.

‘To help tackle this, the government needs to address immediate pressures and plug the funding gap facing adult social care which is set to exceed £3.5bn by 2025, just to maintain existing standards of care, while latest figures show that councils in England receive 1.8 million new requests for adult social care a year – the equivalent of nearly 5,000 a day.’